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Remodeling Your Bathroom: What to Do If Something Goes Wrong

04-11-2018

Photo credit: Pexels License on CC0

Are you looking to become one of thousands of homeowners who, each year, makes the decision to have their bathrooms remodeled? If so, are you also planning on doing that remodeling yourself? While there are a number of advantages to do it yourself bathroom remodeling, there are also a number of disadvantages. One of those disadvantages is the possibility of something going wrong. No matter how much or how little home improvement experience you have, there is always a chance that something could go wrong with your bathroom remodeling project. The good news is that there is almost always a way to fix it.

When it comes to something going wrong and bathroom remodeling projects, you will find that one of the most common problems is that of an injury. Each year, thousands of Americans injure themselves while remodeling their bathrooms. Many times, the injuries are only minor, but other times they can be quite severe. If you do injury yourself, it is important that you get your injury taken care of, whether you need to quickly bandage up a scrape or seek medical assistance. Even if you would rather stay and finish up your bathroom remodeling project, you are advised to seek medical assistance if you need to. Deep, untreated cuts can not only result in the loss of blood, but they can also result in infections. Getting sick isn’t worth a few extra hours of work.

Although bathroom remodeling injuries are quite common, there is something unexpected that occurs even more often. That is a mistake. A large number of Americans, as previously mentioned, make the decision to do their own bathroom remodeling. While many of these individuals do have some prior home improvement experience, not all do. Even if you have home improvement experience, there is always a chance that you could make a remodeling mistake, but the changes are slimmer with prior experience; therefore, it may be a good idea to sign up for a bathroom remodeling class, before you start working.

Even if you have all of the home improvement experience in the world, there is still a chance that you could make a mistake. Most of the time, you will find that this mistake is not the end of the world. Whether you simply used the wrong paint, spilled a small amount of paint on your new bathroom floor, or accidentally cut a floor tile too small, there is always a solution to your problem. The reason why many simple bathroom remodeling mistakes get so blown out of proportion is because many do not take a second to sit back and think about their mistake. If you do this, it will be easier to come up with a solution to your problem, no matter how large or small that problem or mistake be.

Although there is a good chance that you could return to your bathroom remodeling project after a mistake as been made or even after you sustained an injury, you may not necessarily want to. It is not uncommon for many do it yourself bathroom remodelers to realize, after they already started, that they are in way over their heads. The good news is that you should, almost always, be able to seek professional assistance. Many professional contractors are able to not only start a remodeling project, but they can also finish one that you may have already started. Therefore, if you find yourself in over your head, which is quite common; you may want to call upon one of your local contractors or bathroom remodeling experts.

Kitchen Countertop Materials: Comparison Shopping for your Renovation

04-02-2018

Photo Credit: By Pexels CC0 License.

I was helping my daughter having her kitchen remodelled recently. She was having problems trying to decide on a new countertop material. Walking through the counters area in Home Depot gave her a few ideas, but she was still undecided when the time came to choose a month later. I decided to write out a quick comparison of all the materials and costs for her and when I was done I thought other people might find it useful as well, so here goes.

Most people are familiar with laminate countertops. (Formica is one brand name.) They’re a thin surface of high-pressure laminate applied to a thicker base of plywood or particleboard. Pluses: The standby, available in literally hundreds of patterns and colors, laminates are the least expensive (next to tile) and durable, requiring less upkeep than tile. Minuses: Easy to scorch with hot cookware, the use of layers in their construction makes it tricky to repair chips, show scratches, especially lighter colors, so not usable as a cutting surface. Less durable than natural stone or solid surface; use with under mount sinks is not recommended. Cost: $25 to $50 foot

Solid surfacing, (brand names Corian, Fountainhead, Avonite and Surrell) a newer countertop material, is durable and mimics the appearance of natural stone materials like marble or granite. Pluses: Gives seamless surfaces, easy to care for. High impact resistance, easily repaired, nonporous and seamless, so won't trap dirt, collect bacteria or stain; easily. Minuses: May melt from hot pot; looks non-natural in some color schemes, licensed contractor required for installation and repair work. Cost: $60 to $110 per foot.

Natural woods. Used in butcher-block style arrangement. Maple, oak and other hardwoods, make durable and elegant countertops. Pluses: Good surface for cutting foods; scratches easily repaired by sanding; easy match with wood cabinets and floors. Minuses: Requires a finish to preserve appearance, may scorch with hot cookware, allows bacterial growth, so needs regular cleaning. Not practical for entire countertop – good for small sections. Cost: $50 to $75 per foot

Granite. Popular for their elegant and rich look, natural stone countertops will last longer than most kitchens. Pluses: Adds to value of home, hard durable surface, very heat resistant. Minuses: very expensive, requires care since it is porous and must be sealed periodically, grease will stain. Cost: 60 to $200 per foot for granite $60 to $130 per foot for marble (stains easily and not recommended for food prep countertop)

Ceramic or Porcelain Tile: This is the countertop material my daughter was replacing. While the counters were in pretty bad shape, refurbishing was an option. Tile has a comforting, classic look and is inexpensive.. Pluses: Easy to clean up after a mess. More heat resistant than laminates solid surfaces, inexpensive, unless you are thinking about custom or hand-painted tiles. Minuses: Can chip and crack easily; needs regular maintenance to keep bacteria out of grout. Scrubbing grout. Cost: $10 to $25 per foot.

So, what countertop material did she choose in the end? For it’s reasonable cost and reparability, Corian got the nod for the new kitchen. We found a color that was very close to a granite look and we also liked the ten year warranty.

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